To finish up my visit to the Toledo Art Museum, here are a few more masterpieces in their permanent collection.

Paul Guillaume (1915) by Amedeo Modigliani

Paul Guillaume was a Parisian art dealer who became one of Modigliani's earliest supporters.  Along with paintings by Modigliani, Guillaume also dealt with works by Matisse and Picasso.  After his death and the death of his wife, Guillaume's personal collection became part of the permanent collection of the Musée de l'Orangerie in Paris.

Speaking of Picasso...

Woman in a Black Hat (1909) by Pablo Picasso

This early Cubist painting shows Fernande Olivier, one of Picasso's many mistresses.  This type of Cubism was called analytical cubism where the palette was severely limited, largely black, browns, grays and off-whites and the figures rigidly geometric.

Street in Tahiti (1891) by Paul Gauguin

Paul Gauguin, dissatisfied with life in Europe, traveled to Tahiti for the first of many times in 1891.  His renewed enthusiasm shows in the brilliant colors he used in the paintings.

Regatta at Trouville (1884) by Gustave Caillebotte

Not as well known as his Impressionist friends, Gustave Caillebotte came from a wealthy family.  An engineer by profession, he also studied at the Fine Arts School of Paris where he met Degas, Monet and Renoir in 1874 and helped them organize their first group exhibition in Paris this same year.  He also helped them financially by purchasing some of their paintings.

Speaking of Degas...

Victoria Dubourg (1866-1868) by Edgar Degas

A painter herself, Victoria Dubourg was married to French painter Henri Fantin-Latour. Degas went to great lengths to perfect this painting...on the wall behind Victoria you can see the slight images of two framed paintings that Degas removed by changing the wall surface.

Landscape (1906) by André Derain

André Derain also studied engineering but after meeting Henri Matisse and George Rouault he began to pursue an artistic career. A 1901 Vincent van Gogh exhibition influenced the style of Derain and his peers, and they began their use of bold colors and abstract form.  After a 1905 exhibition a critic called them fauves or wild beasts, thus beginning the Fauvism movement.

I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to the fabulous Toledo Art Museum.  I hope you have enjoyed my blog posts showing my favorite masterpieces in the museum.

For more information visit: http://www.toledomuseum.org/.

Toledo Art Museum
2445 Monroe Street
Toledo, OH   43620
Phone: 419.255.6000

For directions: click here.
  • Admission is FREE every day for all visitors.
  • There may be a charge for special exhibitions.
  • Closed Mondays.
  • Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas Day.
  • Open 10:00-4:00 on Tuesday-Thursday.
  • Open 10:00-10:00 on Friday.
  • Open 10:00-6:00 on Saturday.
  • Open 12:00-6:00 on Sunday.
NOTE: All photos of the paintings in this blog post were taken by me on my visit to the Toledo Art Museum in May, 2012.